Are antibacterial soaps killing you?

The FDA wants answers

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/17/health/fda-to-require-proof-that-antibacterial-soaps-are-safe.html

All this time, Alex Jones thought it was fluoride shrinking his testicles and it may end up being the dial soap.

This entry was posted in American Politics, Collapse of America, Fear of Nature, Individual Liberty. Bookmark the permalink.

21 Responses to Are antibacterial soaps killing you?

  1. Parrott says:

    I like wine. In fact life is to short to drink bad wine. I never thought it an issue to have wine, but I was raised Methodist and my parents always had wine with dinner.
    Jesus turned water into wine, Can I have a amen ?

    Parrott

  2. Parrott says:

    why is Barbara Mulkowski D-MD still in congress ? She can’t string two coherent sentences together. Oh answered it myself,,, –> ‘Maryland’.

    The FDA is always fighting the wrong battles. ‘Soap’ ? C’mon, why don’t they actually test drugs from foreign Pharma’s who ship in counterfeit drugs that have no medicinal purposes. They want to regulate Meth labs. Just stifle the free enterprise system. Dorks, if they are not going to do their job, shut them down with the TSA.

    I also saw on the ‘corporate approved news’ that we should not take vitamin supplements, or multivitamins. It wasn’t a FDA report but was some medical report. John Lapoot MD on CBS said too much vitamin E cause’s prostrate cancer and supplements help no one.
    Dam, that is going to hurt ‘Flintstone’ sales. Bam Bam is going to have to get his ass off the couch and get a job mowing yards.
    well, I take extra vitamin D. It is for cholesterol, but an excellent unintentional consequence is that it has helped the joints in my knees and I can walk up and down steps with no pain at all now. I guess the Lapoot report is as good as it cost me to listen to. LOL
    I hope I get a new Stihl chainsaw for Christmas. Cause one is none and two is a good backup.
    parrott

    • Art Stone says:

      The source is the journal of Internal Medicine. It’s very credible, unlike say the Center for science in the public interest. It’s been known for a long time that the best way to speed up your death from cancer is to take vitamins. Cancer are cells that are rapidly reproducing and feeding them lots of high octane nutrients accelerates the tumor growth. Chemo on the other hand tries to starve the tumor – taking you as close to death as you can tolerate, then bringing you back to health, hopefully without the tumor growing back.

      • Parrott says:

        Oh I agree absolutely Art. You should never OD on vitamins and other supplements.
        I should clarify, I take the vitamin D as directed by my physician. You should eat local honey as it is very nutritious and has many benefits for your health, I am pretty sure I had read years ago that local honey helps suppress ‘Free radicals’. Free range honey is good on a biscuit and you shouldn’t have to take a vitamin.
        You would have to sneak in your own small jar of honey into
        K & W.
        parrott

        • Art Stone says:

          First I have to figure how to smuggle a salt shaker into my relative’s homes.

          A very personal anecdote – the setting is my niece’s graduation from Medical School at Columbia University, in the heart of the Upper West Side. I, my sister and my brother and his wife go into a sandwich shop nearby for lunch. After the food arrived, I turned to my sister and said “please pass me the contraband”. She passed me the salt shaker without missing a beat. At the time, King Bloomberg was trying to expand his success at banning transfat onto banning salt (an essential nutrient for all mammals). This seriously confused my brother and his wife.

          Reason magazine just published a poll of what people are on board with the government banning. Close to 80% of Americans want the choice to eat transfats. I don’t know a single politician who has made bringing back transfats a campaign issue.

          • Nidster says:

            Nice anecdote! The idea that food was preserved with salt down through the ages, we know it as the ‘old days’ prior to refrigeration, is a foreign concept to most people. Not to get out to far on a limb here, but the most ridiculous and confused thought I’ve come across was that people should not consume alcoholic beverages due to moral considerations. When I pointed out that Jesus most certainly drank wine, which was an alcoholic beverage, they protested and claimed he only consumed ‘fresh grape juice’.

          • foyle says:

            This is in reply to Nidster re: alcohol and Christianity: I have also heard the “grape juice” argument. I have heard seemingly intelligent Christians who argue that all of the ‘wine’ that Jesus and his followers consumed was non-alcoholic. So then I would ask them, “so why then does Titus say that church leaders (deacons & elders) are “not to be given to MUCH wine”? I usually get a dumbfounded look (perhaps it was to protect from a grape juice overdose?). They cannot seem to wrap their brains around the fact that moderate use of alcohol is not forbidden in the Bible, in fact it is encouraged by both Jesus (at the wedding) and Paul (advising Timothy on a health issue).

            I have extensively studied the history of Prohibition in this country. I learned that the ‘teetotaling’ associated with American Christianity actually evolved, not from conservatives, but liberals (suffragettes and abolitionists) in the 1800’s. Before that time period in the US the vast majority of Christians off all denominations consumed alcohol.

          • Art Stone says:

            This is all a bit fuzzy (probably on purpose) – my father apparently did drink as a young man, but part of the negotiations of getting married would be there would be no alcohol in our house. On one or two occasions, he would eagerly accept an offer at wine at my mother’s sister’s house.

            This was a topic of some dispute within the church I grew up in (Presbyterian). Communion (oops, almost typed Communism!) involved these itsy bitsy little chalices brought around on a plate, but they were grape juice rather than wine. They could have held black tar heroine and still have had no effect.

            I have no interest in telling people what to do. In my case, I’m just not interested. One of the old poll questions asks about people who have their children drink wine with dinner and the degree to which people want the government to “do something”. It’s pretty discouraging.

            Your understanding of the origins of the Prohibitions match mine.

          • Nidster says:

            In the interest of disclosure I will reveal that I have employed a ‘home’ remedy for the past few decades to suppress an ongoing, pernicious infection that is immune to suppression by the use of modern medications/antibiotics.

            What works for me really well is a daily dose of real grape juice and/or dried plums, which have high levels of anti-oxidants. I can skip a day or 2 but after that the infection begins to ‘creep-up’. The infection can still be suppressed with a high dose of those foods. These are natural foods and do not require a prescription. Did I mention they have high levels of anti-oxidants? YMMV

            Wonder if wine would work as well?

          • Art Stone says:

            Try apple cider. I have a gallon you can have.

          • Art Stone says:

            While we’re on the topic, fresh grape juice was a problem to keep around for those wine-free communions. A guy named Welch figured out how to bottle it.

  3. Nidster says:

    Well, this report says a lot: “The Center for Disease Control and Prevention recently issued a landmark health report called “Antibiotic Resistance Threats in the United States, 2013.” For the first time ever, the CDC has outlined a three-tiered ranking of the organisms by their threat to human health. They fall into the following categories: urgent, serious and concerning. This health alert is warranted because deaths caused by super germs in the U.S. now outnumber deaths caused by car accidents. According to the CDC report, “more than 2 million people in the U.S. get infections that are resistant to antibiotics and at least 23,000 people die as a result.”
    http://www.lagrandeobserver.com/Features/Health-&-Fitness/Battling-super-germs

    Sure hope the CONgressional bathrooms and cafeteria are good and clean. We certainly wouldn’t want some ‘super germ’ to accidentally wipeout most of CONgress, now would we?

    • Art Stone says:

      One of the things I struggle with – from time to time, people want to legalize various drugs on the libertarian notion that it is nobody’s business what people put in their body.

      If we head down that path, why would we not allow antibiotics to be sold without a prescription?

      The answer to that is fairly obvious – what is the difference?

      • CC1s121LrBGT says:

        Mexico allows antibiotic to be sold without a prescription. Walk across any official US-Mexico border crossing and in the first city block or two on the Mexican side, most of the buildings have huge signs saying “Pharmacy” in English.

        Once while in Mexico City on business, I got sick and bought a month’s worth of antibiotics for $5 US at a local pharmacy. No prescription needed, but it did require a discussion with the pharmacist.

        • Art Stone says:

          I don’t aspire to become Mexico.

          On the other hand, I doubt they keep treating people with compromised immune systems with more and more exotic and expensive antibiotics creating more and more virulent bugs.

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